Tuesday, 1 April 2014

'Triquetra' and 'Contours' feature in a new BBC film online

You may remember that last year, when I was making Triquetra, that I met Dr Eleanor Barraclough and became involved in contributing audio from Triquetra for a short piece on 'Nightwaves' on Radio 3, (starting at 22:45) looking at the power of Old Norse and Old English as languages.
Eleanor's work is part of the New Generation Thinkers program at the BBC.

I was delighted to be asked to contribute sound to another piece by Eleanor, this time focussing on the difference between the facts and fiction about the Vikings. The differences between myth and reality are quite marked in some areas. Extracts from 'Triquetra' and 'Contours' are both heard in this film. (click on the links to see/hear the pieces online).

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In addition, right now there is a unique exhibition on the Vikings at the British Museum too, so it couldn't be a better time to dig deep into one of my favourite subjects.

An interview with Musey online

It's been an interesting 2014 so far!

Musey is a Harvard University startup. They have developed an app that can be found here.
The idea of the app is to let you know where to find art and artists outside traditional venues and institutions. It benefits artists & those who wish to see art or attend alternative events, providing a usable digital platform for them to find each other.

Judy Sue Fulton, one of Musey's dedicated co-founders and a graduate of Harvard University, kindly asked me if I would be happy to be interviewed for their blog. The results of our conversations over Skype and the Atlantic Ocean can be heard here.
The posts also contain some behind-the-scenes pictures of 'Rose' from the Illuminating York Festival in 2010 as well as some written info on how a piece like 'Crown of Light', for the Durham Lumiere Festival last year, was approached technically.

Friday, 8 November 2013

A Triquetra Conversation

Ross and I had a conversation with a couple of people in a windy Eye Of York about 'Triquetra'.
That conversation, recorded by Nathan Johnston, can be heard here now in all its ad hoc glory!